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Its origins are debated, but the phrase and the distinctive accompanying doodle became associated with GIs in the 1940s – a bald-headed man (sometimes depicted as having a few hairs) with a prominent nose peeking over a wall with the fingers of each hand clutching the wall."Kilroy" was the American equivalent of the Australian Foo was here which originated during World War I.Similarly, The Guardian noted in 2000 that several readers had told them that "Mr.



"Foo" was thought of as a gremlin by the Royal Australian Air Force during World War II, and the name may have derived from the 1930s cartoon Smokey Stover, in which the character used the word "foo" for anything he could not remember the name of. Kilroy as the origin in 1946, based on the results of a contest conducted by the American Transit Association The article noted that Kilroy had marked the ships themselves as they were being built, when they were unmarked, as a way to be sure he had inspected a compartment – so, at a later date, the phrase would be found chalked in places that no graffiti-artist could have reached (inside sealed hull spaces, for example), which then fed the mythical significance of the phrase – after all, if Kilroy could leave his mark there, who knew where else he could go?Our webcam platform is supported by all major devices including but not limited to: desktops, laptops, smart phones and more. Kilroy was here is an American popular culture expression that became popular during World War II; it is typically seen in graffiti.The outrageousness of the graffiti was not so much what it said, but where it turned up." The major Kilroy graffiti fad ended in the 1950s, but today people all over the world still scribble the character and "Kilroy was here" in schools, trains, and other public areas. Kilroy was the origin of the expression, as he used the phrase when checking ships at the Fore River Shipyard in Massachusetts during WWII.

The phrase may have originated through United States servicemen, who would draw the doodle and the text "Kilroy was here" on the walls and other places where they were stationed, encamped, or visited.

One correspondent said that in 1941 at RAF Yatesbury a man named Dickie Lyle drew a version of the diagram as a face when the instructor had left the room, and wrote "Wot, no leave? This idea was repeated in a submission to the BBC in 2005 that included a story of a 1941 radar lecturer in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire drawing the circuit diagram, and the words "WOT! It is unclear how Chad gained widespread popularity or became conflated with Kilroy.